Thursday, February 27, 2014

Cloud Cover

grey rainy day

This unfocused photo was an accident, but it's perfect. The blurriness conveys the grey, rainy mood. I love melancholy weather. It makes me introspective, and inevitably I feel closer to the sad novelists whom I admire. Writing fiction has never been my thing, but wet days are wonderful for sitting softly with a book, sinking into a story and drinking even more tea than usual.

Instead of doing that, X and I went to see an assortment of bits and bobs, grandly titled "Design for Modernity: Art Deco Ephemera from the Collection of Bruce Shyer". In reality, this translated to a couple of glass cases containing postcards, advertisements, and so on, arranged in color-themed sections. Despite being overstated as an event, the experience was eclectically charming. My favorite pieces were whimsical printed matchbooks from nightclubs and hotels.



That's a picture from the website; I didn't bring my camera. I often consider putting it in my bag and then opt not to, because I want to be able to immerse myself in moments.

After observing the shelves full of thingies, we went to Chapeau! for dinner, and then to the Sundance Kabuki theater for Hayao Miyazaki's The Wind Rises. It was good, like every Studio Ghibli movie, and quite tragic, as one expects when the setting is 1940s Japan. I had some moral objections to the way the narrative was framed... but I react like that to lots of media, so whatever.

grey rainy day

If you look closely, you can see white streaks of water falling past the lens.

grey rainy day Fast Food Nation

I finished Fast Food Nation while riding the train into the city, but I took pictures of it earlier, to go with this cartoon from Funny Times (a political satire newspaper that my dad subscribes to):

Funny Times cartoon about fast food

Fast Food Nation was gripping and scary as hell. I already don't eat at McDonald's and etc, but if I did I would quit after reading this. Even more frightening is the broad trend of huge businesses controlling the government, which extends beyond the agricultural industry.

ANYWAY, to close with, here's a picture that I took from the Ferry Building (with my iPod) while waiting for X:

San Francisco Bay, view from the Ferry Building, rainy day

12 comments :

  1. Cuddly sweaters, rainy days, cups of tea and good books. These are the things dreams are made of, in my opinion!

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  2. These photos are absolutely lovely! I really dig the mood you captured, and it even brings a sort of comfort. Your photography skills are noticeably improving, and I can't wait to see what you take pictures of next! I also don't really bring my camera with me to events, and even if I do, I forget to take pictures. (For the same reasons!)

    I work at McDonald's, and it's definitely not my favorite place in the world. It's convenient to work there for now (it's very close to where I live and they let me choose my hours), but I would like to eventually work somewhere else. I have never read Fast Food Nation, but what bugs me the most about the fast food industry is how little the workers are paid. For such a heavily advertised and possibly the most popular fast food restaurant in the world, this seems kind of ludicrous. Then again, who should eat it everyday?

    What kind of things did they highlight in the book? Did anything in particular stand out to you?

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    1. Thank you, Danielle!

      I think the book most emphasizes food production--feedlots, slaughterhouses, etc--but it does talk about the way the restaurant workers are treated, and it's really despicable. At every turn the industry blocks legislation that would improve worker rights & safety, squashes unions, and heartily resists raising the minimum wage.

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  3. I do love that first picture, what a beautiful place you live! As much I love warm sunny days, I really do enjoy dreary, rainy days, I feel like they are great for inspiration and relaxing.

    I haven't read that book but I would like to. I recently watched the documentary Food inc and it made me so glad I no longer eat meat and hardly ever have fast food. It's a strange thought that we have to be afraid of eating certain things.

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    1. I think I've seen Food Inc, although maybe it was a different documentary on the same topic. It really is upsetting.

      And thank you!

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  4. That first photo is stunning, sometimes accidents turn out the better than the ones done properly! I think I am going to find a copy of that book now, it sounds like a good/scary read!

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    1. I definitely recommend it! If nothing else, it provides some well-researched perspective.

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  5. I've been able to give up Diet Coke and most junk food, but I haven't been able to give up drive thru. Just too damn convenient to eat out of a paper sack. There's no way to frame 1940s Japan to please everyone.

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  6. Kind of obsessed with that first photo. Since moving to West Yorkshire, I have really grown to appreciate grim weather, and certainly feel more kindred with the writers from the area, like the Brontes. Have you read Haruki Murakami at all?? If you like really introspection-inducing, modern-ish Japanese fiction, definitely try him. I'd start with Norwegian Wood, followed by The Elephant Vanishes.

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    Replies
    1. I have read a few Haruki Murakami books, although not the ones you suggested! I'll have to put them on my ever-growing list.

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